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New issue of California Fish and Game journal

New issue of California Fish and Game journal

California’s recreational fishery resource provides a huge benefit to the state’s economy. In the latest issue (102-3) of the scientific journal California Fish and Game, Reid et. al tackles the difficult task of quantifying the economic value of California’s recreational red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) fishery.

Using data for the 2013 season at more than 50 sites in Sonoma and Mendocino counties, the authors used the travel-cost estimation method to determine a value. According to their findings, the 31,000 people who fish for red abalone provide an economic benefit to California of between $24M and $44M annually.

The lower figure was derived solely by determining the costs involved in driving to the fishing locations, while the higher figure considers the time spent on the fishing activity. The data reveal three dominant criteria used to select fishing sites: 1) the presence of a harmful algal bloom — and the resulting stricter fishing regulations — in Sonoma County; 2) protection from ocean swells; and 3) the presence of recreational conveniences such as restrooms and boat launches.

Determining the economic value of the red abalone fishery puts into perspective the importance of managing it for sustainability. Other articles in this issue focus on management implications for California halibut (Paralichthys californicus) and Olympia oysters (Ostrea lurida).

Lesyna and Barnes report that California halibut reach physical maturity at different sizes and ages, depending upon location. Macroscopic examination of specimens revealed that, although all halibut were mature before reaching the commercial and recreational minimum legal size limit, central California halibut are larger and older by the time they reach physical maturity than their southern California counterparts.

Moore et. al studied the sexual development and symbionts of Olympia oysters (Ostrea lurida) that settled naturally on artificial clutches placed in San Francisco Bay. The results of the study suggest that Olympia oysters have the capacity to flourish when suitable habitat is available.

Collectively, these articles demonstrate the importance of studying natural resources for their consumptive and non-consumptive value.

According to California Fish and Game Editor-in-Chief Armand Gonzales, the articles provide critical direction for resource management. “It is therefore incumbent upon us as scientists, to keep working, keep studying and keep reporting what we see and find.



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